Patty Adventurers Club

Off-topic discussions about anything you please!

Moderator: gillian

Patty Adventurers Club

Postby Rob » Thu Mar 30, 2006 9:34 am

I figured we should stop hijacking the "So, what do you look like?" thread and put up a separate thread here.

For those who have not been following the birth of the single greatest explorers club since the National Geographic Society and The Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, the humble beginnings of the Patty Adventurers Club may be found here in a conversation that began over the roots of Jessica's screen name, Red Earth.

Already, such intrepid explorers as Jessica and Marybeth have signed up. We have two of our finest swashbuckling rogues, Turk and ScottG on board. And Tim, who had nearly fought the Dragon of Angnor, who had nearly stood up to the vicious Chicken of Bristol, and who had personally wet himself at the Battle of Badon Hill, is also a charter member. And he eats Yodels, too. Or does yodel. Something like that.

But I digress...

Actually, this would be a fun thread for folks to talk about some of the great places they have visited and post some pictures or links to pictures or pictures of links. Whatever you want! I think we have some great people here with amazing travel experiences and it would be neat to hear about them. And it would also be great to get travel recommendations and advice from folks, too.

And someday, maybe we'll get a bunch of folks together at a Pattyfest, or other meetup in some gorgeous National Park, and go take a hike or rappel into a slot canyon.

Anyway, welcome to the Patty Adventurers Club. Please share!
You can't really dust for vomit.

-- Nigel Tufnel
User avatar
Rob
Blue Sky
Blue Sky
 
Posts: 1405
Joined: Tue Jan 25, 2005 10:23 am
Location: Da Big Apple

Postby Rob » Thu Mar 30, 2006 9:51 am

scottz wrote:
marybeth wrote:I like hiking, does that cut it in the PN Adventure Club? I know Smit would join if he ever showed his face around this place!


We used to sit at the Trail-heads at several spots in Rocky Mountain N.P. and watch the real hikers getting their gear on. I remember one group near Alberta Falls, those guys must've spent an hour just getting dressed for it. I can imagine all of their acoutrements were purpose specific, and by no means cheap.
I love the National Parks policy of "Leave no Trace." It isn't hard to find deep respect for the flora & fauna. You find yourself wanting to step carefully and stay "on trail" as much as possible. I remember being above the tree line and into the many species of tundra, getting down on my knees and looking closely at what was happening. You could easily tell that each of the plants were in their own little struggle for survival. Each of them had their little space. It felt almost as though they all were placed there very carefully by god. :)
Oh, by the way. You'll know the really experienced climbers, hikers, and canyoneers when you see them. You'll hear them say "excuse us" as they blow past you and scurry up the trail. We always look at the first couple of lakes or waterfalls on the trail maps, and figure..."well this is only a couple of miles, with only a 100ft. rise. We can do that" Those pro's are like..."Wanna go over it, or around?" :lol:

Zimmo is getting us going over here...

I'm a big fan of the small details in nature, too. I really love the Utah Juniper trees and the way they get all twisted up in places. And the wildflowers in places out west like Colorado and Wyoming are unbelievable. So yeah, there are those who love to rappel or climb up cliffs (me included), but taking the time to stop and get the whole picture, including those little details, is pretty important, too.

It's hard to tell in this photo, but this rock formation in Zion is probably about 8 inches high. I just loved the colors. And if you're not looking, you can blaze right by it.
You can't really dust for vomit.

-- Nigel Tufnel
User avatar
Rob
Blue Sky
Blue Sky
 
Posts: 1405
Joined: Tue Jan 25, 2005 10:23 am
Location: Da Big Apple

Postby Rob » Thu Mar 30, 2006 10:09 am

scottz wrote:I was so proud, when I finally graduated from my walking stick (a real stick) to some adjustable aluminum hiking poles. One of them is like a monopod, so I can attach my sony digital camera. It's very handy, since the camera doesn't weigh much. I recommend using two poles if you're in rocky areas, and it's much safer when crossing streams. A LOT less chance of getting soaked! :lol:

P.S. I may not yodel, but I'll bring along my walnut flute. It's made for the canyons.
...less apt to scare off the wildlife, ya know. :lol:

Good hiking poles (or a good stick) are great. Having them gets a zillion pounds of weight off your knees and onto your arms and upper body. And as Zimmo points out, the really cool ones have other uses.

When all of you folks get out to Zion, there's a hike there known as the Narrows. It's basically a hike up a river and you spend a lot of time in the river surrounded by unbelievably gorgeous high canyon walls. But when you're hiking there, poles are incredibly handy as the rocks on the bottom can be slick and they do tend to move when you step on them. At the point when you hop into the river, there are dozens of hiking sticks lining the wall that have been left for people to use.

And Scott and Tim, we look forward to a walnut flute, yodeling cacophany on our maiden hike.
You can't really dust for vomit.

-- Nigel Tufnel
User avatar
Rob
Blue Sky
Blue Sky
 
Posts: 1405
Joined: Tue Jan 25, 2005 10:23 am
Location: Da Big Apple

Postby girlgoddess » Thu Mar 30, 2006 10:22 am

flying over the clouds at sunrise:

Image


..r
if you have poo, fling it now.
girlgoddess
Up and Flying
Up and Flying
 
Posts: 730
Joined: Mon Jan 17, 2005 10:03 pm
Location: austin tx

Postby Rob » Thu Mar 30, 2006 11:49 am

Beautiful photo, Rach. Thanks for sharing.
You can't really dust for vomit.

-- Nigel Tufnel
User avatar
Rob
Blue Sky
Blue Sky
 
Posts: 1405
Joined: Tue Jan 25, 2005 10:23 am
Location: Da Big Apple

Postby keith from ny » Thu Mar 30, 2006 12:58 pm

Zion really is gorgeous, I wish I'd had more time to walk around when I was travelling through there in July 2001. Here are a couple of stitched panorama shots from the area:

http://kbergend.tripod.com/sitebuilderc ... /utah1.jpg

http://kbergend.tripod.com/sitebuilderc ... /utah3.jpg

Here are a few other travel photos I already have online.

A couple from Sedona, AZ on the same trip:

http://kbergend.tripod.com/sedona1.jpg

http://kbergend.tripod.com/sedona3.jpg

Sunset in Islamorada FL, April 2000:

http://kbergend.tripod.com/sitebuilderc ... sunset.jpg

Chris and I dogsledding in Alberta, February 2002:

http://kbergend.tripod.com/sitebuilderc ... gsled1.jpg

Skiing near Banff, same trip:

http://kbergend.tripod.com/sitebuilderc ... s/sign.jpg

Chris, me and Kerry about two miles south of Key Largo, April 1999:

http://kbergend.tripod.com/sitebuilderc ... /scuba.jpg

(note that even my daughter's wetsuits are stylish)
I don't know nothing except change will come
User avatar
keith from ny
Top of the World
Top of the World
 
Posts: 2197
Joined: Mon May 09, 2005 7:57 pm
Location: Brightwaters, NY

Postby scottz » Thu Mar 30, 2006 3:01 pm

Image
Bear Lake, with Longs Peak as a back-drop. You only have to hike about half a mile around the lake to get these postcard perfect shots! :D


Image
This little waterfall and bubbly pool, just about 150 feet from the road was a neat discovery. There was a larger pool downstream where our toes were cooled.

Image
Ah, this jewel was just a couple of miles north of planetbluegrass (Lyons) home of the Rocky Mountain Folk Festival.

Image
This one is an interesting shot. The camera was on auto-focus so the nearby tree is what it captured. That waterfall is across a deep canyon, I'd guess around 3000 yards away. (a little more than half a mile)

These are all from our trip to Rocky Mountain National Park, from August 2004. We camped at 8500 feet near the old Fall River, just outside RMNP. There was a fellow camped below us, who serenaded us nightly with his bagpipes. The smell of campfires made it hard to fall asleep, as we were always excited about where we were, and how wonderful that aroma was. :)
Waiting for Lightning...
User avatar
scottz
Under These Clouds
Under These Clouds
 
Posts: 486
Joined: Mon Jan 17, 2005 5:11 pm
Location: Hastings NE

Postby scottz » Thu Mar 30, 2006 3:12 pm

Those photos are breathtaking Keith! I LOVE the dogs! :D
That must've been incredible!
I heart Banff.
Waiting for Lightning...
User avatar
scottz
Under These Clouds
Under These Clouds
 
Posts: 486
Joined: Mon Jan 17, 2005 5:11 pm
Location: Hastings NE

Postby Rob » Thu Mar 30, 2006 3:36 pm

Nice shots, Keith. I loved Islamorada. There was this local bar there right on Route 1 called Papa Joe's. The best pina coladas I ever had. And the fried alligator and the sunsets weren't too bad, either. But Banff looks so mundane :lol:.

And I've never been to Rocky Mountain NP, Scott. I hear it's beautiful and those photos certainly whet my appetite for going. That shot of the flower is awesome. My friend from Denver is trying to talk me into coming out there and now I may have to take him up on it.

And the bagpipes... how hilarious. I love the bagpipes but I've never stumbled across a player out west, let alone at a campsite in Colorado. I think I would have loved that.
You can't really dust for vomit.

-- Nigel Tufnel
User avatar
Rob
Blue Sky
Blue Sky
 
Posts: 1405
Joined: Tue Jan 25, 2005 10:23 am
Location: Da Big Apple

Postby Kris » Thu Mar 30, 2006 4:00 pm

Am I the only one that thinks "Patty Adventurers Club" sounds like an after-school day care center?
It's the same old thirst for more
Until they put you in the dirt

*

You saw me through a keyhole
Of a door that I kept locked
But I decorate the threshold
Just in case you knocked
User avatar
Kris
Top of the World
Top of the World
 
Posts: 1720
Joined: Tue Jan 18, 2005 9:39 pm
Location: Portland, OR

Postby Rob » Thu Mar 30, 2006 4:11 pm

Kris wrote:Am I the only one that thinks "Patty Adventurers Club" sounds like an after-school day care center?


Kris, you are herby demoted to junior chipmunk adventurer. And I'm revoking your marshmallow toasting merit badge, too.
You can't really dust for vomit.

-- Nigel Tufnel
User avatar
Rob
Blue Sky
Blue Sky
 
Posts: 1405
Joined: Tue Jan 25, 2005 10:23 am
Location: Da Big Apple

Postby keith from ny » Thu Mar 30, 2006 5:31 pm

scottz wrote:Image
Bear Lake, with Longs Peak as a back-drop. You only have to hike about half a mile around the lake to get these postcard perfect shots! :D

I remember Bear Lake! I picnicked there with a friend out of her old VW Beetle, which barely made it up the hills while we were driving around Rocky Mtn Natl Park. That was 1975, I think -- glad to see it doesn't look much different.


Y'all take some great pictures!
I don't know nothing except change will come
User avatar
keith from ny
Top of the World
Top of the World
 
Posts: 2197
Joined: Mon May 09, 2005 7:57 pm
Location: Brightwaters, NY

Postby RedEarth » Thu Mar 30, 2006 6:25 pm

Rachel, I like your picture, it's, its.....cosmic looking!

Keith, man, you know how to live.

Scott, those are nice pictures, I can just feel the rough texture of the granite and the scrubby pines. Nice flower picture too; coneflower maybe?

I'm gonna have to upload some pictures, this is fun. Keep posting more!
User avatar
RedEarth
Up and Flying
Up and Flying
 
Posts: 610
Joined: Sun Feb 26, 2006 11:03 pm
Location: utah

Postby Our Kid » Fri Mar 31, 2006 1:33 am

OK, so this might become my new favorite thread…

Rob, I love reading about people’s travels. For you to have started this thread is just too cool for words. Kudos to you and please be nice to the Sherpas, ok?

I have been to some really beautiful places. Sometimes there has been a camera and sometimes not. I am so glad to see all these lovely photos. I have so many pix I’d love to post but most of my life sits in a storage unit these days and most of the really tasty pictures are in boxes in there.

I will never resolve within myself the frustration I feel when I take a picture of one of the kinds of places you guys are writing and posting pictures of and then get it back to find, for the zillionth time, that no mixture of paper and chemicals can really capture the view. I’m sure some of you can relate. I’m not just saying that “you had to be there”. It’s so much more than that.

Rob keeps talking about Zion. I was in a Chevy Caprice station wagon in August of 1979 with 10 other people (7 of us were so much younger and smaller) driving through Zion and I will never forget the sense of awe I had. We have this old Super 8 footage (take that, young ‘uns!) from Zion that still gives me the chills. We happened to be there during a rainstorm in the upper canyon area and were at a very good overview spot. My Dad got the opportunity to film as the rainwater started to move along the desert floor at the bottom of this overview. The trickle turned into a stream which turned into a river. Unbelievable.

We had just been to the Grand Canyon as well that week. Have any of you been to Desert View on the South Rim? It was my favorite place along the canyon that we visited. It might be very different now, but back in 1979 it was “off the beaten” path, so to speak. It is on the eastern end of the South Rim. Because of where it is, you look more “down” the Canyon than “across” it. A very dear friend of our family had told us to make sure we went there. The friend had been there and had spent Sunday morning on the Canyon rim playing his Martin acoustic and singing. Believe me, he was the kind of person that could have been playing as you walked up and you wouldn’t have minded. Neither would he, if you know what I mean.

Desert View…
Image

I will have to dig out some of my pix from Utah. Our friends in Vegas (one of them is now one of my biz partners) had an amazing cabin in the Dixie National Forest until a couple years ago. A bunch of us went there one weekend in 1993 or 1994. It was one of the most gorgeous places I have ever been. The cabin was more or less on the edge (not the REAL edge, haha) of a ridge on a huge canyon. On Sunday morning at about 1 AM, a huge torrential thunderstorm hit in that inky blackness. I sat for over an hour watching and listening to that bad boy run down the canyon. We even set the video camera on the porch and let it rip so we could catch the lightening strikes and the thunder. In some ways, I had never heard thunder until I stood in the rain in the dark on that porch and listened to it roll and boom down in the canyon below me. Again, unbelievable.

I have a friend and former employer who spends every winter on Islamorada. I have never been there, but Nick swears it is heaven. Maybe someday I will get there. I did spend a week on Palm Island which is in the Gulf about halfway between Sarasota and St. Petersburg. I thought Michigan was humid until that last week in June spent on Palm Island that year. It was during the 1994 World Cup (when that t%$t Baggio blew his PK over the bar to blow it for Italy in the final against Brazil) and I remember watching a few matches when I wasn’t in the water. Everyday around six PM it would rain like hell for about 10-20 minutes and soak the shit out of EVERYTHING. I swear you could set a watch by it.

I never camped until I was in my mid-20s. Two of my very best friends took me Lake Muskellunge State Park on the northern shore of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. They knew I had never camped and purposely took me to a “backwoods” style camp site, where you have to live more rustically. After that 4 days, the chances of me car camping were gone forever. On such a trip with no one around and our mother the Earth wrapping her arms around you it is perhaps not unusual to strip naked and run like a lunatic into Lake Superior with a flaming driftwood torch over your head, whooping like mad. I wish I could say drugs or alcohol were to blame, but that was not the case. I do have a photo to prove it, haha.

A couple years later I went with one of those two guys and my girlfriend at the time to hike the Sleeping Bear Dunes on the shore of Lake Michigan and spend a few days at another backwoods campsite. It was on that trip that I learned that dad’s late-1950s military issue backpack from Ft. Leonard Wood Missouri is NOT a good pack for such an experience. Shortly thereafter, I bought my Dana pack. One of my greatest backpacking memories ever is sitting on the edge of the dunes as the sun went down over Lake Michigan on the day we hiked back out. We all sat there and shared the last bottle of beer in our packs, which was a Geary’s Pale Ale from Maine. Fucking brilliant…

Here is a pic of Sleeping Bear Dunes. You get some sense of their size by comparing the dunes on the left side to the freighter on the right side. Basically, we parked the car in a lot and walked the dunes for miles until we found the place where the trail led up to the backwoods campsite.
Image

You guys, I don’t know that I can adequately describe the beauty of my home state. If you want to hike or fish or backpack or snowshoe or cross-country or downhill ski, this is one of the greatest places in this Country, I swear it. Michigan in the autumn will make you weep, brothers and sisters. It is lovely.

ScottZ mentioned the “leave no trace” policy at National Parks. When I first got into camping I read Walking Softly in the Wilderness, The Sierra Club’s definitive book on how to (and how not to) hike and backpack. I learned a great deal from that book. I have the third edition, I think. Mine is “pre-GPS” for sure. If you are into backpacking, I recommend reading it. I’m sure some of you guys have.

Please keep the stories and pix coming, you guys. I love this! Hopefully this thread grows along with us and our experiences. I would really like to see that happen.

Let There Be Love,

Tim
"You could write a song about some kind of emotional problem you are having, but it would not be a good song, in my eyes, until it went through a period of sensitivity to a moment of clarity. Without that moment of clarity to contribute to the song, it's just complaining."

-Joni Mitchell-
User avatar
Our Kid
Up and Flying
Up and Flying
 
Posts: 574
Joined: Sat Jan 22, 2005 1:47 pm
Location: Detroit, Michigan

Postby Rob » Fri Mar 31, 2006 10:06 am

Thanks for the photos and the stories, Tim. I'm sure many folks here are dying to see pictures of the lunatic Lake Superior incident.

Sadly, never been to Michigan. I've wanted to go ever since hearing Greg Brown talk about the UP on his album, The Live One. He says "it's like Alaska or something." I hear they also have a second-rate hockey team in that state, too. :wink: :lol:

Anyway, I've only just recently switched to digital so most of my photos are not easily postable. I'd love to post some from my trip to New Zealand, but that took place in 1994 and the digital camera wasn't really an option back then. There's always the scanner, but that's a project for another day.

Here are a few from my trip out to Tahoe last year. I skied at Heavenly and did some snowshoeing in the mountains near there. Heavenly is an awful place to ski. Those that have been there know of what I speak. It's awful because when you get up to the top, the view is so incredible, you don't have much of a desire to ski down :lol:. And when you are skiing, you get distracted by sights such as this. (Actually, the skiing is awesome if you're contemplating a Tahoe ski trip)

Snowshoeing was incredible, too. I hiked into a place called Eagle Lake. There was no one around and it was amazing. I like this shot of my snowshoe tracks on the lake. I had a great lunch of smoked oysters and a granola bar on the little island on the left side of the photo.

And this is the only island on Lake Tahoe.

Look forward to seeing more stuff and hearing more tales of traveling lunacy. As for me, there was my time in a Turkish prison, but Turk doesn't like to talk about that.
You can't really dust for vomit.

-- Nigel Tufnel
User avatar
Rob
Blue Sky
Blue Sky
 
Posts: 1405
Joined: Tue Jan 25, 2005 10:23 am
Location: Da Big Apple

Next

Return to The Watercooler



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests

cron
All photos © Traci Goudie