Sgt. Peppers, etc.

Yes, there's a whole world of music out there besides Patty.

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Postby keith from ny » Tue Feb 10, 2009 9:13 pm

ScottG wrote:Also, John and Paul wrote about half the songs on that album. So they weren't strictly a cover band, even at that early stage.

I don't really consider that their "early stage." By the time they recorded that first album in the Fall of '62 they did have maybe a dozen original songs which they had recently started playing as part of their (very broad) repertoire at The Cavern. But John, Paul and George had already been together for 2+ years with various drummers by then and making a name for themselves, playing mainly American rock 'n roll, R&B and rockabilly (although also some cabaret-style material like A Taste of Honey and Till There Was You). FTR that's what I meant when I said they "started out" as a covers band.
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Postby keith from ny » Tue Feb 10, 2009 9:34 pm

ScottG wrote:
Hugues wrote:As early as the White Album, you can feel something missing in the Beatles identity as a band, it already sounded like the start of their future "solo" careers in some way.


Great thought! But, for me this is what I hear when I listen to Pepper. In hindsight it sounds like the beginning of the end. The whole "let's do a record as if we're not the Beatles" thing seems part of that. Only "Lovely Rita" sounds like a real collaborative effort. For me, it is the only song on the album that has that old spark.

I'll go you guys one (actually two) further -- the emergence of the Beatles as non-collective individual artists for me really starts with Rubber Soul. Norwegian Wood is clearly a Lennon song, Yesterday is pretty much all McCartney, and most of the rest aren't hard to attribute to one or the other (or George) either.

Despite their emerging individuality, I see Sgt. Peppers as very much an intensely collaborative effort among the four of them (+ George Martin). You can certainly tell who wrote most of each song on most tracks, but generally all four members have crucial parts to play. And of course A Day In the Life is perhaps the ultimate Lennon/McCartney songwriting collaboration. I don't much care for the insipid She's Leaving Home or the droney Within You Without You myself, but I consider every other song on the album masterful in its own way. Plenty of spark there for me!
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