Thea Gilmore

Yes, there's a whole world of music out there besides Patty.

Moderator: gillian

Thea Gilmore

Postby Fool On Fire » Mon Apr 25, 2005 2:33 pm

Let's say you were a 23-year-old musician. Where would you be in your career? Well, assuming you were a run-of-the-mill twentysomething singer/songwriter (if there even is such a thing), you'd be working on your songwriting technique, pounding the pavement, racking up a core crew of die-hard fans, playing gigs at every hole in the wall where the owner would allow you half an hour of time, and praying to get enough funding to record a CD.

But if you're Thea Gilmore, you emerged full-force onto the British folk-rock scene with the lyrical talent to rival Ani DiFranco and are so musically amorphous that you could be classified as a punk rocker, a mainstream pop artist, or an indie-folk goddess. If you're Thea Gilmore, you released your first full-length album when you were 19 and have since released 5 more plus a rare EP; you've toured as the opening act for Joan Baez and been interviewed on national radio; you can pack venues large and small in England AND the United States.

I know there are a small crew of Thea fans on this board already...Arlene, Turk, Fred, myself...and of course, there's also Ian, who is a member of her fan messageboard and can back me up on her amazing-ness IF HE EVER GETS AROUND TO REGISTERING. *cough* ;) So I figured we needed a thread to commiserate about her; how did you find her? What "incarnation" of Thea do you like best - hard rocker, sweet folkie, pop princess? Which album is your favorite? Do all of you have her brilliant little EP release, As If, and her album Loftmusic, composed entirely of covers?

Let's dish,
~Elise
I've become the beggar now, and you've become the saint somehow
twist the words and place the blame, and tell me now, aren't we the same?

-- Amy Ray

born under a bad sign, been down since I began to crawl
if it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all

-- Albert King

the saints and all the martyrs look down on dying converts
"what makes the water holy," she said, "is that it's the closest thing to rain..."

-- Josh Ritter


...the blues is the roots...everything else is the fruits...
User avatar
Fool On Fire
Top of the World
Top of the World
 
Posts: 1883
Joined: Mon Jan 17, 2005 6:02 pm
Location: The Realm of the Mind

Postby marybeth » Mon Apr 25, 2005 2:47 pm

She's been on my must-buy list for some time....
http://www.marybethdamico.com

Image

Some people don't care if they live or they die
Some people want to know what it feels like to fly


Americana: "a nebulous category of misfits and acquired tastes, many of whom seem to have worn cowboy hats at one time or another" LA Times article
User avatar
marybeth
Top of the World
Top of the World
 
Posts: 3625
Joined: Tue Jan 18, 2005 4:40 pm
Location: Jersey City, NJ

Postby Fool On Fire » Mon Apr 25, 2005 3:22 pm

Just for fun, these are some of my favorite Thea lyrics:

God's electrician sparked up the heavens once again
heading northbound on the 7:10
and the lord said "let there be commuters
talking pension plans, medicals, and monthly targets end to end"

-- Exit Route (from THE LIPSTICK CONSPIRACIES)

there is something so beautifully chic
about burning out so young
when you accessorize with bruises on your cheek
and cool tricks of the tongue
you're spending Saturday alone
drowning heartache out with cheap red wine
I know you want to make the news
but lately all you do is memorize the headlines

-- Juliet (from AVALANCHE)

I've seen the ghosts of the ashes and the orchids
got promises tattooed to the insides of my eyelids
I'll be watching when the Richter reaches ten
I bled by these weapons, babe, and now I'm one of them

-- Apparition #12 (from RULES FOR JOKERS)

would you look at this place, at the sign on the wall
we're all suddenly free - we don't pull any punches at all
imagination runs riot, there's a choice of three doors
tell me, what's a pretty girl to do in a land of metaphors?

-- Sugar (from BURNING DOROTHY)

could you say that again babe? I've not heard that one before
you're looking four years older, you're looking for the door
I lipsticked "fuck you" on the mirror as a mark of my respect
and wandered out into the street - well what the hell did you expect?

-- The Things We Never Said (from RULES FOR JOKERS)

I am the steel, I am the dare
the angry kid with mud in her hair

-- You Tell Me (from AS IF)

Okay, I could get carried away with this.

...maybe I already have, :lol:
~Elise
I've become the beggar now, and you've become the saint somehow
twist the words and place the blame, and tell me now, aren't we the same?

-- Amy Ray

born under a bad sign, been down since I began to crawl
if it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all

-- Albert King

the saints and all the martyrs look down on dying converts
"what makes the water holy," she said, "is that it's the closest thing to rain..."

-- Josh Ritter


...the blues is the roots...everything else is the fruits...
User avatar
Fool On Fire
Top of the World
Top of the World
 
Posts: 1883
Joined: Mon Jan 17, 2005 6:02 pm
Location: The Realm of the Mind

Postby altCountryGuy » Mon Apr 25, 2005 3:39 pm

Where is a good place to start? I have heard a few clips and such. What's considered her best album?

Everybody needs a little forgiveness.

http://www.last.fm/user/altCountryGuy/
Image
User avatar
altCountryGuy
Under These Clouds
Under These Clouds
 
Posts: 354
Joined: Mon Jan 17, 2005 5:19 pm
Location: Texas

Postby Fool On Fire » Mon Apr 25, 2005 3:46 pm

I'd go with Rules for Jokers, David. It has some of my favorite songs on there - "Saying Nothing," "Apparition #12," "The Things We Never Said," and "Saviours and All" are just a few of the great songs on there. It's outstanding. It is also the easiest of her albums to find in the USA, since it was the only one to actually get released here...all the other albums are imports, so they jack up the price and the shipping can kill ya. (Though if you ask me, it's worth it.)

If you like RFJ, then go with The Lipstick Conspiracies. That one is so textured and lyrical and fiercely political...it reminds me of Ani, at times (minus the weird arrangements and jagged guitar).

I can also email you some samples if you want,
~Elise
I've become the beggar now, and you've become the saint somehow
twist the words and place the blame, and tell me now, aren't we the same?

-- Amy Ray

born under a bad sign, been down since I began to crawl
if it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all

-- Albert King

the saints and all the martyrs look down on dying converts
"what makes the water holy," she said, "is that it's the closest thing to rain..."

-- Josh Ritter


...the blues is the roots...everything else is the fruits...
User avatar
Fool On Fire
Top of the World
Top of the World
 
Posts: 1883
Joined: Mon Jan 17, 2005 6:02 pm
Location: The Realm of the Mind

Postby disco_fred » Mon Apr 25, 2005 10:15 pm

How did we not have a Thea Gilmore thread before?

I learned of this lady thanks to my pal Elise (yay!) and have been hooked ever since I heard her terrific voice and thoughtful lyrics.

And she does a killer take on "Straight Up" by Paula Abdul. But since the light of Thea was shone on me, I have been discovering all kinds of wonderful songs that she's done -- "Eight Months", "Bad Idea", "Juliet", "Saying Nothing", "Gun Cotton", "Take Me Home" ... and on and on.

Her songs have a real beauty, whether she's singing an angry song, a ballad, an up-tempo tune, or whatnot. She's really worth listening to.
User avatar
disco_fred
Blue Sky
Blue Sky
 
Posts: 1051
Joined: Sun Feb 20, 2005 5:50 pm
Location: in the studio with Abba

Postby Fool On Fire » Tue Apr 26, 2005 11:44 am

disco_fred wrote:And she does a killer take on "Straight Up" by Paula Abdul.


Hahaha...doesn't she? She takes that song, swings it around, and turns it into an acoustic gem. I'm not usually one for cover songs, but Thea's version of "Straight Up" is nothing short of brilliant.

She does a very nice version of "When I'm Gone" (the old Phil Ochs folk song) on Loftmusic, as well.

~Elise
I've become the beggar now, and you've become the saint somehow
twist the words and place the blame, and tell me now, aren't we the same?

-- Amy Ray

born under a bad sign, been down since I began to crawl
if it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all

-- Albert King

the saints and all the martyrs look down on dying converts
"what makes the water holy," she said, "is that it's the closest thing to rain..."

-- Josh Ritter


...the blues is the roots...everything else is the fruits...
User avatar
Fool On Fire
Top of the World
Top of the World
 
Posts: 1883
Joined: Mon Jan 17, 2005 6:02 pm
Location: The Realm of the Mind

Postby Fool On Fire » Wed Apr 27, 2005 11:25 pm

Here is a really interesting interview with Thea from the online webzine Three Monkeys Online. She has some wonderful, articulate things to say. She's so smart and well-informed. :D

MY GENERATION - Thea Gilmore in interview

March 2005

By Andrew Lawless

And who's gonna raise a hand
When all we were taught to do was dance
Who'll be able to stand
After this avalanche

Thea Gilmore - "Avalanche"


If Pete Townshend felt provoked, by an overbearing post-war generation, to write My Generation exhorting his elders to "just fade away," Thea Gilmore’s ire seems aimed as much, if not more, at her own age group. Whether it’s the world weary, literate, and bitterly disappointed "Avalanche," or the more upbeat but no less pointed songs like "Mainstream" or "When Did You Get So Safe," Gilmore has plenty to say, to her generation. "I am tired of the apathy of my generation... it is an incredibly materialistic demographic that I operate in, and if any song I write cuts through that, even a little, then I am doing my job right."

Gilmore has, with little fuss, managed to take the term 'indie' and put some meaning back into it. While groups of similarly besuited and hairstyled bands qualified for the term simply because they played guitars and weren't 'pop,' she was busy recording self-financed albums, and releasing them to ever wider circles. Perhaps it's because of this D.I.Y. ethic that she's remarkably frank in her interviews. In these dark times, for all the 'singer-songwriters' that seem to be out there, very few artists are willing to admit that their music exists outside of a vacuum. "I think that anybody, not just musicians, who plays an active role in society has a duty to be political," she says, when I ask whether it's right for musicians to comment, in their songs, on politics. "I don't even mean just with a capital 'P,'" - she continues - "there are very few things in day-to-day life that are not political in some way. I have a responsibility to be aware of my surroundings and aware of how my actions affect others. It really is impossible to sing a song that isn't some kind of social commentary."

You could be forgiven for thinking that Gilmore is a dyed-in-the-wool political folkie, particularly after a profile boosting tour of the States with Joan Baez (this writer’s father suggests, with a sad shake of his head, that music died the day that Joan Baez picked up a guitar, but that may just be his opinion), but nothing could be further from the truth, or rather the whole truth. She started writing songs at the age of 16, after a work experience stint in Fairport Convention's studio, so it’s no surprise that some of her work has an element of 'folk,' but her records are delightfully diverse. She seems to change styles as easily as stringing together her elaborate, rythmic lyrics. She seems reasonably happy to be labelled folk, but then again, her definition of folk includes Kurt Cobain's Nirvana. "Folk music is a very broad term," Gilmore explains, "and it always depends on who is defining it to you at the time. My definition of 'folk' music, is music that has touched and/or motivated a populous in a way that is not marketing-driven. So my theory that 'Smells Like Teen Spirit' is a folk song is because of the mass appeal it had at a grass-roots almost subconscious level."

And if Nirvana are 'folk,' what about the Britney Spears and Spice Girls out there? How can you differentiate between pop and folk at the end of the day? "Britney Spears and The Spice Girls? I'm sure there is an argument," she answers, "but my thought is that without the marketing powers behind those acts, they would never have acquired their place in public consciousness. I don't think the same could be said for Nirvana."

But, surely, at the end of the day Nirvana had a major record label, and MTV support etc. Isn’t it a bit elitist to define the Spice Girls as popular because of their marketing budget, while Nirvana, who were on a major label, are 'folk' because they have some artistic credibility - notwithstanding their own marketing budget? "Like I said, folk is subjective," she responds, "one man's folk is another man's pop (which of course is short for popular which in turn suggests folk). I was just airing my opinion, which, as a songwriter, is bound to be more in favour of the writing process rather than the marketing. I think Nirvana's songwriting had the ability to reach out to a generation, which is a very powerful tool when it is coming from the heart behind the song, people really felt and identified the soul in Cobain's music and marketing was just a tool to push that soul out into the world. Personally I find it hard to imagine that the Spice Girls' music touched anyone on a level deeper than just nifty pop songs, but then I was the wrong age to really 'get' them and perhaps I am doing them a disservice. Either way, the idea of folk music really depends on who is defining it." And then, she continues, with tongue in cheek, "these are just my feelings and I am a musical snob!!!."

Indeed, reading through her lyrics, one could imagine how she might be more than a little cynical at the branding of 'Girl-Power' champions like the Spice Girls. While writers like Kathy Acker were keen to co-opt the Spice Girls as feminist icons, Victoria Beckham expressed an increasingly common view about the 'f-word,' when she said, "I wouldn't consider myself a feminist. We all admire strong, independent women, but I'm a romantic." Thea Gilmore, who it should be pointed out has written some jaw-droppingly beautiful love songs in her time, is unafraid to declare herself a feminist: "I think anyone who has any sort of empathy for humankind should consider themselves feminists," she explains, continuing "It isn't about militance or aggression, it is about decency and humanity. I think feminism should be able to exist in the context of anything, unfortunately the music industry seems to be so incredibly reactionary.. It's almost the final frontier in the basics of gender politics."

Because she's stylistically diverse, both lyrically and musically, it's difficult to sum Thea Gilmore up as an artist, which is no bad thing. If forced to, though, interviewing her and listening to her music, one could describe the driving force of her work as a struggle to imbue music with mystery in the face of an industry that, more often than not, prefers to imbue it with a new clothing line. "I think cynicism is king. I am as much a victim of it as anyone. But there are some unexplainable things left in this world and I think music is one of them. I still listen to the progression of words and music together, and am as mesmerised by it as I was when I was three," she says. At the same time, in songs like "Rags and Bones," she has approached a familiar theme in the world of poetry, though less so songwriting: the process of writing ("Rags and Bones" is a reference to W.B. Yeats' line from The Circus Animal's Desertion: I must lie down where all the ladders start, In the foul rag-and-bone shop of the heart ). "I think deconstructing the process," she explains, "behind writing songs is always useful... more than anything because the more you deconstruct, the more mysterious it seems... as someone who is intent on finding the magic in life, there is no better way than not being able to explain why you are able to do the things you do." [One of her most vociferous fans is cult fantasy writer Neil Gaiman, of whom she says "I love his novel American Gods, and Coraline is one of the best books written for children... it scared the shit out of me!"]

While discussing Yeats, I suggest, with a benign streak of nationalism, that perhaps it's her Irish heritage that provides the literary leanings in her songs. It's a notion that she neither denies, nor wholeheartedly subscribes to: "Any wordsmith is an influence, and obviously with my Irish heritage, Yeats is someone I grew up with. I think poetry is always a wonderful source of inspiration." She enthusiastically recommends Autumn Journal by Ulster poet Louis MacNeice: "I love the way it is so ‘of its time’. It really is just a poetry journal of the time just before WWII and even he wasn't aware of the resonance that this work would have in the light of world events." When MacNeice was writing, there was still a fairly widespread respect for poetry. Does she think poetry has been replaced in subsequent generations by songwriters, and if so, is that a good or a bad thing? "I'm not sure that poetry has been replaced by song," she replies. "I think it is possible for the two to co-exist quite happily alongside one another but possibly the respect for poetry from my generation has diminished. I don't think that is the fault of song though, there are very few current songwriters around whose work could be considered poetry. I just think that we are the first of the instant generations, things have to be made easy or we just don't bother."

For any singer-songwriter there’s a delicate balance between the love of lyrics or melody. "I am always more drawn to words rather than music. I am much more likely to get excited about a song that is ingenious lyrically than one that is musically exciting," she says, but, at the end of the day, a song has to take on a personality for her, whether it be through the force of the lyrics or the music, or a combination of both. "A song idea just has to hold water for me," she says, when I ask her if she consciously tries to avoid repetition in her own songs. "It has to feel real. I try not to consciously avoid very much because I try not to be too conscious when I write. I prefer channelling rather than pummelling an idea out." Polly Paulusma, in the last edition of Three Monkeys Online, suggested that she would like, provided the resources, to give non-English language audiences a translation of her lyrics. Thea Gilmore, from experience, reckons that audiences will relate to music regardless of language barriers: "Non English-speaking audiences do seem to enjoy my work, which I am always very surprised about... In France, one of the most popular songs was "Mainstream" which to my mind had the most lyrics and the least tune out of anything on Avalanche." Perhaps it’s the mention of Balzac that gets Gallic hearts aflutter.

For me one of the signs of a truly great talent is that they can both write their own songs, and also turn in an inspired cover version. Gilmore certainly fits this bill. She's done versions of the Buzzcocks' "Ever Fallen in Love," the Clash's "I'm Not Down," and even Paula Abdul’s '80s "Straight Up." The first track I heard her sing was Bob Dylan's intriguing "I Dreamed I Saw St. Augustine" from the John Wesley Harding album. It might be easy enough to approach a Paula Abdul song, and add something, but how does one approach a song by the semi-canonical Dylan? "It is a very daunting task to cover a song by Dylan," she agrees. "We [with her producer and long time collaborator Nigel Stonier] chose it because it seemed like one of the few Dylan songs that I could bring something new to. It was more of a feeling for the song than a cognitive thought process. I leave the gritty stuff to Nigel! I just felt that I could bring a dream-like quality to the song that felt appropriate."

Cover versions aside, who are the sort of artists that she respects? For example, if she could work with anyone living or dead, who would it be? "How long have you got?" she jokes. "The poets I've mentioned, like Yeats and MacNeice because of sheer talent. The likes of Benjamin Zephaniah, because of the beauty and grit in his work. Billy Bragg because of his political opinion and his way of making you fall in love with him through songs, Tony Benn because he's Tony Benn... All of the above with Neil Young playing the guitar, because he is the best guitarist living or dead!" When asked how she manages to be so prolific, and whether she worries about writer’s block, she laughingly responds "I do get it from time to time anyway, but usually a good dose of musical roughage in the form of Leonard Cohen or Neil Young is all the fibre I need to clear the constipation!" - which is surely the first time those two Canadians have been referred to in that manner, at least in a positive light.

And what does the future hold for Gilmore? A new album is in the works, no doubt to be followed by extensive touring. Wouldn't it make sense at this stage to 'play the game'? Is it such a bad thing to, for example, take on a stylist, and play the game, if it gets the music out there? A pragmatist might say that it's the songs that matter at the end of the day, not the artistic integrity of the record sleeve. She responds with both the pragmatism, and scorn that the question demands: "I've never really deliberately pooh-poohed the mainstream just because it was the mainstream. It is the control exercised over artists within it that has made me shy away from it. I think the result of that control has been a very stale sounding musical output and I object to the narrowing of an industry that is at the core of me and an art form that I strongly believe is very important. Taking on a stylist and playing the game is neither here nor there really, I would find it hard to be styled just because I'm a control freak who hates people touching her. And playing the game? It just depends on what game you're playing. It truly is the songs that matter at the end of the day, you are quite right, but while we allow the 'industry' dictate the nature of those songs, we will never see the true nature of the art behind it. That is my objection. If ever a label came to me and allowed me that freedom, I would have no problem."

And so, there we end. A gushingly positive interview perhaps, but give a listen to Thea Gilmore in the near future and you'll understand why.


Sorry that's so long, guys, but it's a really good article.

Hope you enjoy,
~Elise
I've become the beggar now, and you've become the saint somehow
twist the words and place the blame, and tell me now, aren't we the same?

-- Amy Ray

born under a bad sign, been down since I began to crawl
if it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all

-- Albert King

the saints and all the martyrs look down on dying converts
"what makes the water holy," she said, "is that it's the closest thing to rain..."

-- Josh Ritter


...the blues is the roots...everything else is the fruits...
User avatar
Fool On Fire
Top of the World
Top of the World
 
Posts: 1883
Joined: Mon Jan 17, 2005 6:02 pm
Location: The Realm of the Mind

Re: Thea Gilmore

Postby Ian » Sun Jun 05, 2005 1:54 pm

Fool_on_Fire wrote:I know there are a small crew of Thea fans on this board already...Arlene, Turk, Fred, myself...and of course, there's also Ian, who is a member of her fan messageboard and can back me up on her amazing-ness IF HE EVER GETS AROUND TO REGISTERING. *cough* ;)
~Elise


That's a nasty cough you have there Elise :wink:
I still don't blame you for leaving baby... it's cold living with goats
Ian
Blue Sky
Blue Sky
 
Posts: 1149
Joined: Wed Jun 01, 2005 1:46 pm

Postby Fool On Fire » Sun Jun 05, 2005 3:13 pm

That's a nasty cough you have there Elise

I know, I was beginning to despair of it ever going away - but it magically cleared up on the first of June. Remarkable, really. :D

So seeing as you're in the UK, Ian m'lovely, have you heard anything further about Thea's new album? Any news at all? I hope we'll get a chance to hear it before the year is out, but every time I google her name I get so few hits that I'm getting a bit discouraged. :(

I've been binge-ing on The Lipstick Conspiracies recently. "Generation Y?" is such a good song. Hell, they're all so damn good. I'm also stuck on "My Own Private Riot" and "Night Driving." Hey, Klary and Nicole, did y'all ever get the Thea tunes I sent you?

Curious, :)
~Elise
I've become the beggar now, and you've become the saint somehow
twist the words and place the blame, and tell me now, aren't we the same?

-- Amy Ray

born under a bad sign, been down since I began to crawl
if it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all

-- Albert King

the saints and all the martyrs look down on dying converts
"what makes the water holy," she said, "is that it's the closest thing to rain..."

-- Josh Ritter


...the blues is the roots...everything else is the fruits...
User avatar
Fool On Fire
Top of the World
Top of the World
 
Posts: 1883
Joined: Mon Jan 17, 2005 6:02 pm
Location: The Realm of the Mind

Postby Ian » Mon Jun 06, 2005 6:26 am

Prynhawn da Elise, sut mae lol


I'm glad to see you're keeping the Thea flag flying proudly over there.

I can't tell you anything that you probably don't know anyway.

Thea has been unusualy quiet for a while now because as you know, in the time most artists take to record one album, Thea has already got hers in the can, done the promotional tour and has half written the next.

I was reading your post about Thea's writing ability and totaly agree with you about her lyrics.
She is so prolific a writer that you think she might run out of steam sometimes and do a few shallow, less wordy songs but NO, every one is so packed with feeling and acid comment that you sometimes struggle to properly absorb it all (if that makes sense).

I'm glad you have won over a few people here, to her exceptional talent and hope you have managed to pass on a copy or two of the boot I sent you.

Elise, I strongly recommend that you check out the mp3 of KT Tunstall that I have linked elsewhere on this site. I think you, of all people here, might apreciate her earthy, rock chick qualities.

Hwyl am nawr
I still don't blame you for leaving baby... it's cold living with goats
Ian
Blue Sky
Blue Sky
 
Posts: 1149
Joined: Wed Jun 01, 2005 1:46 pm

Postby Klary » Sun Jun 12, 2005 8:43 am

Elise, thanks to you mentioning Thea G. in chat the other day, I checked her out.. listened to a couple of songs from Rules for Jokers in my record store today.
I liked it very much!
She is definitely on my list of "have to buy this soon" now.
thanks for recommending (although I am not really sure I should be thankful for the fact that my "have to buy this soon" list is growing and growing, while my bankaccount is going steadily in another direction :shock: )

edited for spelling. 'a copule of dongs'??? :roll:
How the little dreams we dream
are all we can really do
User avatar
Klary
Under These Clouds
Under These Clouds
 
Posts: 220
Joined: Fri Jan 21, 2005 12:41 pm
Location: Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Postby Fool On Fire » Sun Jun 12, 2005 1:32 pm

Ian wrote:I was reading your post about Thea's writing ability and totaly agree with you about her lyrics. She is so prolific a writer that you think she might run out of steam sometimes and do a few shallow, less wordy songs but NO, every one is so packed with feeling and acid comment that you sometimes struggle to properly absorb it all (if that makes sense).

I'm glad you have won over a few people here, to her exceptional talent and hope you have managed to pass on a copy or two of the boot I sent you.


Of course it makes sense, cariad bachgen. There isn't really any "filler" in Thea's repertoire. Every song packs a punch. I was listening to Lipstick Conspiracies the other day in the car and I had just gotten over the rocking-ness of "Generation Y?" when on comes "Resurrection Men." I tell ya, I'm usually pretty good at learning artists' songs, but to have those two back-to-back...it blows me away so much that all I can do is sit and listen, I've never really managed to learn all the words!

Oh and regarding that lovely boot...it's an acoustic show Thea played with her guitarist/producer/boyfriend Nigel Stonier. This is an offer that's open to anyone: if you want this boot, PM me and it's yours. (I'm going to be in New Orleans until Thursday night, so I won't be able to start burning until Friday/Saturday of next week, but I will get the disc to whoever wants it.)

Klary wrote:Elise, thanks to you mentioning Thea G. in chat the other day, I checked her out.. listened to a couple of songs from Rules for Jokers in my record store today. I liked it very much! She is definitely on my list of "have to buy this soon" now.


Aww YAY! I'm so glad you like her, Klary...tell you what, I'll save you some $$...if you PM me your address I will mail you the aforementioned bootleg and a couple "extras." Let me know if you're game. :)

Yr maent yr mynyddoedd yn canu, ac y mae'r arglwyddes yn dod,
~Elise
I've become the beggar now, and you've become the saint somehow
twist the words and place the blame, and tell me now, aren't we the same?

-- Amy Ray

born under a bad sign, been down since I began to crawl
if it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all

-- Albert King

the saints and all the martyrs look down on dying converts
"what makes the water holy," she said, "is that it's the closest thing to rain..."

-- Josh Ritter


...the blues is the roots...everything else is the fruits...
User avatar
Fool On Fire
Top of the World
Top of the World
 
Posts: 1883
Joined: Mon Jan 17, 2005 6:02 pm
Location: The Realm of the Mind

Postby Klary » Sun Jun 12, 2005 1:49 pm

Fool_on_Fire wrote: Aww YAY! I'm so glad you like her, Klary...tell you what, I'll save you some $$...if you PM me your address I will mail you the aforementioned bootleg and a couple "extras." Let me know if you're game. :)

~Elise


I'm game. Gamer than game! I'm also in the address book..
Aww Elise you're too sweet.

And now might be a good time as any to tell you that I think your avatar is HOT.
I can't stop looking at it! That Melissa Ferrick is one very sexy girl!
How the little dreams we dream
are all we can really do
User avatar
Klary
Under These Clouds
Under These Clouds
 
Posts: 220
Joined: Fri Jan 21, 2005 12:41 pm
Location: Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Postby marybeth » Sun Jun 12, 2005 2:18 pm

I've also been meaning to buy me some Thea for ages now.....which one do I start with again?
http://www.marybethdamico.com

Image

Some people don't care if they live or they die
Some people want to know what it feels like to fly


Americana: "a nebulous category of misfits and acquired tastes, many of whom seem to have worn cowboy hats at one time or another" LA Times article
User avatar
marybeth
Top of the World
Top of the World
 
Posts: 3625
Joined: Tue Jan 18, 2005 4:40 pm
Location: Jersey City, NJ

Next

Return to Music. (Other than Patty!)



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron
All photos © Traci Goudie