Patty Griffin Emotion and Energy

Talk about Patty to your heart's content.

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Patty Griffin Emotion and Energy

Postby Little_Kites » Wed Jan 14, 2009 9:10 pm

I know there was a thread for articles about Patty somewhere but I couldn't find it anywhere (sorry) so here we go:

Patty Griffin
Emotion &Energy
by Kerry Dexter

cd cover Patty Griffin's songs have been recorded by artists as diverse as the bluegrass group Southern Rail, country superstar trio the Dixie Chicks, and folk Grammy winner Emmylou Harris. She's lent backing vocals to projects by mystic cowboy Ray Wylie Hubbard, Harris, and and alt-country heartbreaker Julie Miller. So what do Griffin's own recordings sound like?

To begin with, she has a unique, sultry alto that holds a tinge of blues, and though she's from Maine, a hint of Southern twang. She's a gifted writer, and a gifted interpreter of song, as well. "She's just so giving in performance, there's so much emotion and energy," commented fellow musician Buddy Miller. "Put her voice together with the songs she put on this record, and it's just amazing. I can't stop listening to it."

"I didn't really try to make anything fit for this record," Griffin said of her most recent release, 1000 Kisses. "But you know, I was talking to Doug Lancio, who co-produced it with me — I was lookin' at the list and said this album actually hangs together, even though they were some I'd just written plus some leftovers from other projects. They all worked together, probably because they're all really sad!" Griffin said, laughing.

Griffin is a storyteller with a unique point of view, no doubt of that, and the tales she chooses are often about people confronting the darker sides of life. That insight is combined with a compelling voice and a musical intelligence that allows the singer to explore the melodic and emotional layers of each phrase while keeping things deceptively simple. Griffin knows her strengths, too. Respected music writer Dave Marsh commented in The Austin Chronicle that "Griffin's songs are so good, in part, because they're crafted to be sung...it's not that [she] sacrifices sense to sound — she's too good to have to make such choices — it's just that her music is so, well, musical."

That began in her childhood. "My grandmother is a singer, my mother is a singer, it was just a part of their everyday life to sing, you know," she reflected. "They sang all the time, doing work around the house. I thought that's what everybody did, growing up." That was in Old Town, in western Maine, and the songs were in both English and French. Griffin's mother's family is French Canadian. That may account, she speculated, for the Southern tinge in her accent. "There is, and always has been, a twang in my voice," she said. "And something nasal, too. I think that's the French Canadian stuff, actually — anyway, I love that sound. And I can't really help it — I've got the nose!"

Griffin got her first guitar when she was 16 and began writing songs right away, but she kept them mostly to herself. "I was a little too shy to play out much," she said, though she did a brief stint with a cover band. " I did have a pretty wide range of things I was listening to back then. The Beatles were my first really big wow! band, from an early age," she recalled. She was the youngest of seven children, and the records her older siblings brought home, among them releases by Rickie Lee Jones and Bruce Springsteen, also made a lasting impression on the teenager.

Griffin wasn't thinking of a career in music after high school, but after living in Florida for a short time, she moved to Boston, married, and worked as a waitress and a telephone operator while continuing to write songs. While she remained on the edges of the Boston/Cambridge music scene, she became friends with and occasionally played with local artists, such as Ellis Paul. She also hooked up with guitar teacher John Curtis. "I got a guitar teacher, so at least I'd have to play in front of him every week!" she recalled, laughing. "I was too timid to get out there and play, and he helped me out a lot that way. He booked a gig for us to do together, and then we started doing more, where he'd play guitar and I'd play guitar and sing. It was a lot easier for me to get onstage that way. I think I was kind of overwhelmed by the city, coming from such a small town. And I had a lot of work to do." She also credits Curtis and her Boston friends with giving her tips on editing her writing and planning arrangements. One of her songs, "I Write the Book," was included on Legacy II: A Collection of Singer Songwriters, which was a project of the High Street label, a Windham Hill subsidiary that at the time had signed Pierce Pettis, John Gorka, and Patty Larkin, among others.
Some demos Griffin recorded around this time in Boston came to the attention of A&M Records. Intrigued by the combinations of bluesy, gutsy vocal and intelligent, intimate lyrics, they offered her a deal and matched her up with producer Nile Rogers. They recorded elaborately arranged versions of the songs at Daniel Lanois' Kingsway Studio in New Orleans, and the label hated the result. It was "very beautiful, but I felt like I played a very small part in it," Griffin said. She proposed that rather than redo the album, they release the demos, with just her vocals and guitar, as the record. With a few minor fixes, that's what happened, and it became the 1996 release Living With Ghosts. That turned out to be a record that established Griffin as a distinctive voice in the singer/songwriter genre, drew praise from those in the Americana scene, and enabled Griffin to set out on a very long solo tour.

But..."I always felt like I wrote rock songs," she said. "It was all I listened to. I lacked confidence — I didn't feel like I had enough to offer a rock band. That's what I always thought I was writing, though."

This is an excerpt from an article in Dirty Linen #102 (Oct./Nov. '02). Read the full text in the magazine, available via subscription or on newsstands and in bookstores.
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Postby outta » Wed Jan 14, 2009 9:27 pm

An interesting read and a very nice and well written article! It's hard for anyone to try and explain the beauty of Patty's songs and voice ... Dexter succeeded nicely! Thanks for sharing!

I didn't know Patty is from Maine or that she had been married. :shock:
"Tell me the truth, you sweet son of a bitch"
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Postby marybeth » Thu Jan 15, 2009 5:55 am

Well, Theresa, you clearly need to read the bio of Patty on this website!
;-) Everything you need to know there....
http://www.marybethdamico.com

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Some people don't care if they live or they die
Some people want to know what it feels like to fly


Americana: "a nebulous category of misfits and acquired tastes, many of whom seem to have worn cowboy hats at one time or another" LA Times article
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Postby LimeTwister » Thu Jan 15, 2009 1:07 pm

Yeah, MB's right...and some AMAZING writer wrote it. ;)
I guess I'm taking my chances
Giving up the ring, throwing in the gloves
I guess I'm taking my chances
Trading in my things For a couple wings on a little white dove
And one big love, one big love
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Postby Little_Kites » Sun Feb 08, 2009 7:26 pm

Here is another article:

Patty Griffin Finds Latest Inspiration in Country Music
Posted: August 27th, 2008 at 4:12 pm | By: Craig Shelburne

Patty Griffin. I can’t tell you how many nights I’ve spent at home with a bottle of red wine and a Patty Griffin album. Back in the day, that was my favorite way to cope with all the angst. Thank goodness I’m out of the woods now, but I thought about those rougher times last night when I was at the Mountain Winery in Saratoga, Calif., where she was performing at their small amphitheater. If you love her like I do, you’ll be overjoyed to know that she’s got a handful of new songs - and she said she’s been listening to a lot of country music these days, including George Strait, Tom T. Hall and Lefty Frizzell.

I don’t know all the song titles for sure, but after she was talking about country music, she sang “Forever, Wherever I Go,” about how some relationships will always stick with you, even if you don’t know how the story’s going to end. (My interpretation.) She also wrote a song for a high school graduation this year, and to me, it was brilliant. The lyrics reminded the students that it might be the last time they’d see each other, but the world was waiting - and that it wasn’t going to be sunshine and roses every day out there. She has such an economy with words that continues to impress me. I also loved “Waiting for My Child,” a heavy song about missing someone desperately. Written by Pops Staples, she has also recorded the song with Mavis Staples, and it’s coming out on a gospel compilation album next year.

She graciously closed the set with “Up to the Mountain,” which seemed like a perfect ending, since we were all on top of the mountain. Even without the red wine, I definitely felt at home.

http://blog.cmt.com/2008-08-27/patty-gr ... #more-1268
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Postby Kelsea » Sun Feb 08, 2009 9:03 pm

I love that Patty's been listening to George Strait. I don't listen to much modern country, but George has always been big in my family and I think he's a fantastic musician and a little underrated. Thanks for posting the interview.
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Postby Little_Kites » Fri Feb 20, 2009 2:14 pm

Three Girls and their Buddy review:

One of the best things about song swap-style concerts is how they often veer off in unexpected directions.

That's just what happened Tuesday night when Emmylou Harris, Patty Griffin, Shawn Colvin and Buddy Miller -- Three Girls and Their Buddy, as the tour is billed -- spent a couple hours trading tunes at the Warner Theatre in Torrington.

Each performer represents a slightly different niche of roots music, and together they compiled a compelling survey of the breadth and depth of what's usually lumped together under the catch-all term "Americana."
Although each singer played in turn, sitting in a row on stage, they rarely played alone: Each sang harmony for the others, Harris added texture with a shaker, Miller contributed trebly electric guitar licks, Griffin provided percussion with a little lap drum and Colvin chimed in with acoustic guitar and tambourine.

The set featured original material, naturally, including Harris' wrenching "Red Dirt Girl" to open the show and Colvin's wistful "Wichita Skyline." Just as interesting, though, were the cover songs, which the musicians drew from often-obscure corners in the rich history of folk, country and even gospel music.

Griffin touched on the latter with a rendition of "Tear This Building Down," a weathered and powerful protest song she learned from a version by the Staples Singers. Her voice, rich and craggy, expanded until it rang out, bolstered by harmonies from the others, fully immersed in the sentiment of the song.

Colvin took the show in a rather more earthy direction with her cover of Tom Waits' "Hold On," and harmonies from Harris and Griffin added deceptive sweetness to a song about bad choices and restless living.

Miller countered with his take on post-war country duo Johnnie & Jack's song "Poison Love." Miller's version bore a south of the border influence in his guitar playing and the percussion parts from the others.

He and Harris sang a duet on her song "My Antonia," though Harris' best moment came on another cover. Her take on Mark Germino's "Broken Man's Lament" showcased her elegant singing, and the particular way her ghostly voice swooped low was enough to raise chills.

Each took the lead role five times before Griffin led the others in another gospel number, "We Shall All Be Reunited," to close the main set.

They returned for to perform the Stanley Brothers' spiritual "Bright Morning Stars," the three women clustered around one microphone while Miller played faint chords on acoustic guitar in the shadows. They ended with captivating harmonies on Griffin's "Mary."

http://blogs.courant.com/eric_danton_so ... ty-gr.html
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Postby Little_Kites » Sun May 03, 2009 2:37 pm

I've never seen this article so I thought I'd share it here:

Words Are Enough: Patty Griffin

A few years ago Patty Griffin played a show at the House of Blues on Sunset Strip. It was amazing that this tiny woman with an acoustic guitar could so fill the big place with a joyful sound, even as she sang about alienation and heartbreak. Then a spectral presence in a diaphanous dress appeared behind Patty, and people nudged one another all through the crowd — for it was the legendary Emmylou Harris, in a fabulous gown. Emmylou stepped to the microphone to sing backup, announcing seriously, "I've just come from the Grammy Awards, and this ..." (with a crowning hand over Patty's head) "... is who should've been on that stage."

Indeed, having turned out great songs since 1992, Patty Griffin seems to get due respect mostly from fellow songwriters, some of whom (Emmy Lou, Mary Chapin Carpenter, Bette Midler and the infamous Dixie Chicks) have covered her songs. Others, like Steve Earle and Lyle Lovett, list her emphatically among their heroes. Still, Patty seems to be a bit challenging for most, though she writes hooks like Lennon and McCartney, and has a voice more torchy than Opry. Perhaps she's not Apple Pie enough. Instead she's an unflinching writer, unapologetic about the bittersweetness of her work.

Often drawing on her early years in rural Maine (more Deliverance than Kennebunkport, it seems), Griffin fashions hard little narratives in sparely authenticating detail, and sets them to some of today's most haunting melodies. With mind-meld empathy, she depicts an amazing range of characters: a grieving widower, a shell-shocked vet, an alienated heiress and a white-trash mother. Here she introduces Tony, a small-town "faggot" and ultimate suicide:

Does anyone remember Tony / A quiet boy, little over weight / He had breasts like a girl / When I wasn't too busy feeling lonely / I'd stare over his shoulder / At a map of the world / He always finished all his homework / Raised his hand in homerooom / He called the morning attendance / With the pledge allegiance to the gloom

At other times she seems to speak straight from the heart, evoking unadorned emotion. In a few lines of "Goodbye" she provides a phenomenology of grief, the way it doesn't wound with one fell, melodramatic swoop, but lurks, blindsiding you long after the fact:

Today my heart is big and sore / it's tryin' to push right through my skin / I won't see you anymore / I guess that's finally sinkin' in

Much of Griffin's material is dark, but she can be funny, punny and glib, too, as in the imagistic "Careful" — just a shot-list really with various "girls" — cool, breezy, sophistiqué as a perfume commercial, "All the girls in the restaurant / Pretending to be nonchalant / Funny girls on the TV shows / Close your eyes and they turn to snow..." And she can laugh at herself, as in "Mad Mission":

We were drinking like the Irish / But we were drinking scotch / Bartender turned on a movie / Everybody turned to watch / And every single eye was gleaming / As he reached the final scene / Well, at least mine did / Here's lookin' at you, kid

In "Nobody's Cryin'" Patty gives another take on the Big Goodbye, moving from mock-heroic metaphor to resonant, photorealist detail, richly emblematic yet concrete as a letter-bomb.

Well he jumps in the taxi, headed for the sky / He's off to slay some demon dragonfly / And he looked at me, that long last time / Turned away again and I waved goodbye / In an envelope, inside his coat / Is a chain I wore, around my throat / With a note I wrote / Said I love you but I don't... / even know why.

Griffin's long pause on the last line, denoting ambivalence or denial, rescues the whole thing from cliché. If one tried to put that trope in fiction or on film it would probably just be laborious or lugubrious; here, as a throwaway opening to a vignette about forgiveness, it gives a rich sense of what the note means, and doesn't, to both of the characters.

There's not much bling or partying in Patty Griffin's oeuvre, instead there is the paradox of dark beauty, some our hardest moments hauntingly redeemed through precise, cathartic articulation.

— David Essex

http://www.flakmag.com/music/lyricists/griffin.html
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Postby Little_Kites » Mon May 11, 2009 5:40 pm

Here is another one about three girls and their buddy in Toronto 6/5:

Harris, Griffin, Colvin, Miller Set For Opening Of Toronto Fest Of Arts 6/5

Monday, May 11, 2009; Posted: 05:05 PM - by BWW News Desk

Emmylou Harris, Patty Griffin, Shawn Colvin, and Buddy Miller will kick off the opening night of Luminato, Toronto Festival of Arts and Creativity, with a special show at Massey Hall. These four incredibly talented musicians have been collaborating with one another for years and now perform an intimate performance as part of Luminato. This is a rare opportunity to see some of the most celebrated songwriters together on one stage.

The "Three Girls and Their Buddy" shows feature all four artists performing onstage together, sharing the songs and stories that have defined their venerated careers. The four have a long-established history of musical associations, having been in each other's bands, produced and played on each other's albums, covered each other's songs, and guested on each other's shows many times over the years. Buddy Miller was Emmylou's band leader in the outfit Spyboy and produced her live album by that name.

Patty Griffin's song "One Big Love" was recorded by Emmylou, who has made appearances on Patty's last two studio albums. Emmylou, Patty and Buddy - with Gillian Welch and David Rawlings - toured together as Sweet Harmony Traveling Revue, a special run of collaborative shows. Buddy has performed many times over the years with Shawn Colvin, beginning with her inclusion in The Buddy Miller Band in the 80s in New York City and leading up to the These Four Walls tour in the fall of 2006. The group reunited in October 2008 for a spirited performance at San Francisco's Hardly Strictly Bluegrass Festival.

Twelve-time Grammy winner, Billboard Century Award recipient and member of the Country Music Hall of Fame Emmylou Harris has been admired throughout her career for her talent as an artist and song connoisseur, but it was with her most recent studio releases that she also revealed herself to be a gifted songwriter. In June 2008, her latest studio record, All I Intended To Be, was released to wide critical acclaim. On this record her songwriting and song-interpreting abilities are equally highlighted: the album includes four songs written or co-written by Harris, and also features striking covers, including Billy Joe Shaver's "Old Five and Dimers" from which the album's title was taken and "Moon Song," a never-before-released tune written by Patty Griffin. Known for bringing country and roots music to a new level of prominence and respect, Harris has recorded more than 20 albums and has sold more than 15 million albums worldwide and she is one of the most sought-after collaborators of this century. Emmylou Harris has lent her talents to fellow artists on countless records, including, as a guest vocalist on recent releases from Patty Griffin, Buddy Miller, Bright Eyes, Neil Young and Elvis Costello. Billboard magazine has called her "a truly venturesome, genre-transcending pathfinder." www.EmmylouHarris.com

Patty Griffin's latest album, Children Running Through (ATO), continues the remarkable creative evolution that has established Griffin as a vital and singular musical force and a songwriter of great emotive power. The emotional depth and breadth of her songwriting has won Griffin a fiercely loyal fan base that's continued to expand. The list of Patty's higher-profile admirers includes Emmylou Harris, a longtime supporter who has covered several Griffin-penned songs and who also appears on Patty's latest album, contributing harmony vocals to "Trapeze." Also on that list are the Dixie Chicks, who recorded much-loved versions of the Griffin compositions "Top of the World," "Truth No. 2" and "Let Him Fly" and Solomon Burke, who covered "Up to the Mountain (MLK Song)" on his latest record. Impossible Dream, Griffin's 2004 release, saw appearances from artists such as Lisa Germano, Emmylou Harris and Buddy & Julie Miller. In October 2007, Griffin's 14-song live DVD Patty Griffin: Live from the Artists Den was released. The exclusive concert took place at the Angel Orensanz Foundation for the Arts, a converted synagogue on New York's Lower East Side in February of 2007 and was shot in HD and mixed in both stereo and 5.1 audio. Griffin is in the process of assembling material for a new record. www.PattyGriffin.com

Three-time Grammy Award winner Shawn Colvin continues to captivate listeners with her heartfelt songs and unique guitar stylings. Over the course of an enduring career Shawn has released eight albums (including the platinum-selling A Few Small Repairs, which featured the hit song "Sunny Came Home"), maintained a non-stop national and international touring career, appeared on countless television and radio programs, had her songs featured in major motion pictures, and created a remarkable cannon of work. Born in Vermillion, South Dakota, Shawn spent years honing her art in cities as far apart as Austin, San Francisco and New York, where she helped define the "new folk" movement in the late 1980's.

Her debut album Steady On and subsequent albums Fat City, Cover Girl, A Few Small Repairs, Holiday Songs And Lullabies and Whole New You proved her to be one of the subtlest, most musicianly singer-songwriters of her time. Her most recent album, These Four Walls, (2006), was lauded by People Magazine as "the most self-assured album of her career" and "one for the ages" by the Washington Post. Shawn is currently preparing material for a live album, to be released in the spring of 2009. She recently signed a deal with Collins Publishers to publish a memoir, which will be a natural extension of the intimate, personal and often hilarious stories that she weaves into her live concerts. www.ShawnColvin.com

Named instrumentalist of the year by the Americana Music Association (AMA) for the past two years, Buddy Miller is one of the more highly sought after guitarists and has played shows or in recording sessions with such greats as Emmylou Harris, Steve Earle, Shawn Colvin, Lucinda Williams, Jimmie Dale Gilmore, Jim Lauderdale, Robert Plant and Alison Krauss. As a songwriter, Buddy's songs have been cut by such artists as The Dixie Chicks, LeeAnn Womack, Jim Lauderdale and Emmylou Harris, among others. As a producer, his resume is just as impressive; he produced Emmylou Harris's live album Spyboy; Solomon Burke's most recent solo work, Nashville; the forthcoming Allison Moorer covers record Mockingbird, all five of his own solo masterpieces; and the Grammy-nominated record Buddy made with his wife and celebrated songwriter Julie, Buddy and Julie Miller. Buddy's own records boast a blend of soulful country country arrangements, heartfelt balladry, honky tonk and the occasional soul cover. In 2005, Buddy took home Album of the Year for Universal United House of Prayer and Song of the Year for the album's cut "Worry Too Much." One of the treasures of modern Americana music and musicianship, Buddymost recently toured with Robert Plant and Alison Krauss on their "Raising Sand" Tour. A new Buddy and Julie Miller record titled "Written In Chalk" is expected out in March 2009. www.BuddyMiller.com

Presented in association with Luminato Toronto Festival of Arts and Creativity.

Friday, June 5, 2009 at 8 pm / Massey Hall

178 Victoria Street, Toronto

Tickets $79.50 - $59.50 - Call 416-872-4255 or visit the Roy Thomson Hall Box Office

www.masseyhall.com

http://broadwayworld.com/article/Harris ... 5_20090511
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Postby Little_Kites » Mon Jun 29, 2009 8:51 pm

Three Girls and their Buddy at the Greek Theatre

Roots-music heavyweights Emmylou Harris, Shawn Colvin, Patty Griffin and Buddy Miller share the homey stage.
By Mikael Wood
June 26, 2009

Not long into her concert Wednesday night at the Greek Theatre, just as the sun was dipping below the horizon, Shawn Colvin sang a lovely version of Robbie Robertson's "Twilight," in which the narrator makes a pretty solid case that "twilight is the loneliest time of day."

Good thing, then, that Colvin had some company to help stave off the isolation: Emmylou Harris, Patty Griffin and Buddy Miller all shared the spotlight Wednesday with the "Sunny Came Home" folkie; the four roots-music heavyweights are currently touring together as Three Girls and Their Buddy.

Like the uncluttered stage -- which featured four chairs, four microphones and a small assortment of mostly acoustic instruments -- the show's setup was simple. For two hours the musicians took turns singing lead while accompanied (to varying degrees) by the other three. Harris, who served as the evening's unofficial host, called it "this songwriters-in-the-round thing we've got going."

They opened with an eerie ghost-gospel take on "To Know Him Is to Love Him," an old Phil Spector tune that Harris first recorded with Dolly Parton and Linda Ronstadt for their 1987 album "Trio." Harris dedicated the song Wednesday to Miller, explaining that she, Griffin and Colvin had taken to singing it onstage earlier this year after Miller suffered a heart attack and was forced to drop off their tour.

Recounting that experience later, Miller highly recommended triple-bypass surgery -- especially, he said, "if you can do without the heart attack."

The artists' banter was sometimes more entertaining than their playing: "I'm 45 years old and I've written two love songs in my life," Griffin admitted before singing "Heavenly Day," from her most recent album, 2007's "Children Running Through." (And the other one? "Our Love Is a Dud," which Griffin also played, though not before copping to her fear of "being nominated for president of the Bitter Women of America Club.")

The relaxed atmosphere gave the Greek the feel of somebody's living room, which only increased the charm of material like Harris' "Love and Happiness for You," a ballad about the persistence of parenthood that Harris introduced by saying that her mother still insists she wear a bike helmet.

Yet the casual vibe also seemed to dampen the overall intensity of the show, as if the singers were merely marking their moves rather than investing fully in the music; only Colvin and Miller really raised the stakes, the former in a wound-tight cover of "Crazy" by Gnarls Barkley, the latter in a handful of down-and-dirty country blues such as "Gasoline and Matches," from Miller's excellent 2009 album with his wife Julie, “Written in Chalk.”

Of course, intensity is only one of a performer's tools; nearly as important are empathy, a sense of humor and the ability to tap a hand drum and sing backup at the same time, as Griffin did during Harris' "Red Dirt Girl."

"This is the best gig in the world," Harris said at one point. Maybe, maybe not -- but you could tell that she believed it.

http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/ne ... 5512.story
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Postby Little_Kites » Fri Sep 11, 2009 12:59 pm

Patty Griffin | A soaring voice tinged with sorrow

She's been left, lost, leaving and lonesome. In other words, Patty Griffin is heartbroken, and — sorry, Patty — thank God. In her achingly beautiful...

By Joanna Horowitz

Patty Griffin's latest release, "Children Running Through," showcases her ability well as both singer and songwriter.

Patty Griffin's latest release, "Children Running Through," showcases her ability well as both singer and songwriter.

She's been left, lost, leaving and lonesome.

In other words, Patty Griffin is heartbroken, and — sorry, Patty — thank God.

In her achingly beautiful lilt, Griffin sketched a parade of lonely Americana characters Monday night at the Moore Theatre for a concert that was washed in blue.

Griffin's songs have been covered by some of folk/country's greats: Linda Ronstadt, Emmylou Harris and the Dixie Chicks. But because her lyrics are such personal meditations, it's Griffin's versions that are the most poignant. And though the 40-something, country-tinged and -twanged folk singer has seven albums of well-crafted music, it is her latest release, "Children Running Through," that showcases best her ability as both singer and songwriter.

The 2007 release — her best-selling yet — brings the spotlight directly on Griffin's nuanced soprano. The music retreats behind the dips, swoons and soars of her voice.

Review

Monday at the Moore Theatre, Seattle

Monday, the most stunning moments were replications of that simplicity, songs with a slow build, a brief growling climax and a smoldering fade. Griffin found the pitch-perfect tension of the high wire and desolation of circus life on a breathtaking version of "Trapeze." She wrapped her notes around the bluesy licks of Sam Cooke's "Get Yourself Another Fool." With a small smile, she breathed the gorgeous first single from "Children," "Heavenly Days." ("I have a love song," Griffin said by way of introduction. "The truth of it is, I wrote it about my dog.")

Not every song was melancholy — at least not musically. The ache in Griffin's voice never fully went away, even when it was covered by a little growl on some gritty rock. Griffin and her four-piece band tore through "Useless Desires" with Griffin thrashing on her acoustic guitar.

They ended the second of three encores with the Dylan-esque romp "Getting Ready," starting it off with the explanation, "Seattle is a great rock and roll town, so we thought we would leave you with a big rock and roll song." But after the semi-enthusiastic crash of wailing guitar and drums that wound the number down, Griffin looked at the audience with a shrug as if to say, "We tried."

She came back a third time alone to sing a song in French that she wrote for her grandmother, who passed away in November. As she played the first notes on the piano, Griffin's face took on the same look that overcame her during most songs — somewhere between sorrow and ecstasy — and her French needed no translation.

Life can be melancholy, and sometimes the most beautiful tales are the saddest.


http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/entertainment/2003627947_patt21.html?syndication=rss
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Postby Little_Kites » Tue Dec 08, 2009 2:57 pm

Patty Griffin a singer/songwriter with soul:

Seeing her at the movie premiere of "Elizabethtown" in Franklin, Tennessee, I might not have found Patty Griffin's music on my own.

Patty is a singer with soul, and she has a fan club that most musicians would die for. (Many of her fans were standing next to us at the right of the stage.)

Patty Griffin signing autographs for her young fans at the premiere of 'Elizabethtown'. I found her to be intriguing. She's got a great voice, and apparently, she's a good actress too... She landed a part in the "Elizabethtown" movie where she plays Sharon.

Patty Griffin Music Video
Here's some video we took at the premiere of the "Elizabethtown" movie at Franklin Cinema... This clip shows the movie's director, Cameron Crowe, introducing the I Nine band, then Patty Griffin. You get a sampler of the music from both.

http://thefuntimesguide.com/2005/10/patty_griffin.php

Also this was interesting maybe I'm out of the loop but I didn't know Patty's stuff was featured in that many tv shows: http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0341330/ (they forgot Kite Song, which was in an episode of Joan of Aracadia)
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Joined: Tue Jan 25, 2005 12:08 pm
Location: above the sadness and the fear

Postby Little_Kites » Fri Dec 11, 2009 6:03 pm

I think this is from when they were in Ithaca, NY

A transcendent night with Three Girls and their Buddy

I don’t gush much about events. I’ve seen a lot of shows over the years. This one, however, is worth all the accolades I can muster. Something special happened in the State Theater this past Monday night when Emmylou Harris, Patty Griffin, Shawn Colvin and Buddy Miller all graced our stage. The magic was palpable and the connection between crowd and performer was blurred into rarely seen nigth of pure and total connection.

I’d say the magic began when the news that Buddy might just get here in time started surfacing a week out.He plays on countless records and tours with everyone – most recently Alison Krauss and robert Plant – and was invited to join them on stage at the Grammys in LA after or show was confirmed. We alerted the press and several ticket buyers were upset. His news of trying to get here in time was exciting – but three connections across the country in winter didn;’t seem possible. However, when we all heard he made his third plane connection of the day in Philly and was on the correct flight due for Ithaca Airport at 6pm the Girls began to light up.

I took the Girls with their road manager next door to the antique shop where they loaded up on goods and then we sat at dinner at a makeshgift table in the back of the theater waiting for Buddy to arrive. Earlier in the day, Emmy mentioned how much she missed her dogs, so my wife and son brought our dog, Miles, as a dinnertime surprise. She and the rest of the crew were excited as they are all huge dog and animal lovers. We had a great meal from Maxies Supper Club and as we finished, in walked the so-called “monkey-boy,” Mr. Buddy Miller.

The Girls were incredibly happy to have Buddy back and he quickly checked his mike and guitars (unfortunately one didn't make the connection – but we picked it up for him later that night) and he joined me for a quick bite before doors opened.

Once they took the stage you could tell it was a special night for them and their chiding and begging for stories from Buddy’s night at the Grammy’s filled the banter between songs. The poor Jonas Brothers. They were the subject of most of the jokes. And this living room conversation translated into a comfort for each performer that hadn't before been reached in years of touring together. Shawn played songs she never plays. The capper was when I was settling the show with Carolyn, the top choice road manager, we hear Emmy begin “Imagine.” Carolyn bolted up the stairs to watch saying – “She never plays this – she must be so incredibly comfortable.” That iced the deal – that Ithaca truly “got” this show and our 1611 seat theater was merely a big comfy couch in someone’s living room.

It all wrapped up after a few hours and we toasted a great show backstage with some fine wines. The Girls and Buddy met fans on stage and then signed near the bus before heading back on the road. I can’t imagine they’ll have more fun anywhere else on this leg of the tour. Thanks to Buddy for taking that huge trip after such a special night. It allowed all of us

http://www.dansmallspresents.com/smallsworld/?p=2094
Little_Kites
Blue Sky
Blue Sky
 
Posts: 1110
Joined: Tue Jan 25, 2005 12:08 pm
Location: above the sadness and the fear


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