Patty Mentions

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Postby Russell » Wed May 05, 2010 10:54 am

From a Whitney Pastorek (of course) interview with country singer-songwriter Chely Wright:

Entertainment Weekly: [we are engaged in some pre-interview chit-chat about live performance and big arena spectacle.] On the flip side, I went to go see Patty Griffin a couple nights ago, and…
Chely Wright: The Patty? Living with Ghosts changed my life, changed how I write songs. It perhaps saved my life. My guitar, my bike, and Patty Griffin. There’s a song I didn’t record for this record called “Love for Patty Griffin.” It’s one of the ones I played when I went to [Lifted producer] Rodney [Crowell]’s house with my broken guitar and my broken self and said, “I think I’m dying,” and played him the songs that came to be Lifted Off the Ground.

How did she save your life?
Because she knew me in her songs. “Sweet Lorraine,” “You Are Not Alone,” “Nobody’s Crying,” “Mary.” I was reaching for God at this time in my life, and when I heard “Mary” and the Living With Ghosts album, I felt like God was whispering in my ear.

She’s been duetting with a lot of male country stars lately. Could she survive a career in mainstream country?
No. I think she’s so good she just doesn’t have to tolerate what the rest of us have to tolerate. Like getting your ass grabbed by a radio guy. Why would Patty Griffin ever walk into a room of drunk radio guys and get her ass grabbed? It’s a really broken template, because the labels are imploding. I’m not happy about it. I don’t look at that and go, ha ha ha. It’s heartbreaking to watch the labels close, because all my pals, they’re out of jobs. But you can’t do it the way we’ve been doing it.

LINK
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Postby sfboy » Fri May 07, 2010 8:59 pm

Great little snippet there! She obviously has never hear One More Girl! I think Patty knows all about her butt being grabbed, unfortunately :(

Anyway, thanks for the snippet!
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Postby Little_Kites » Sat May 08, 2010 1:02 pm

I like this snippet to! I like how she calls Patty, The Patty, sort of makes me think everyone should be wearing a WWPGD (what would Patty Griffin do?) bracelet (hahah :wink:) an it made me wonder why I haven't listened to Living with Ghosts in a while. so all is good and of course its nice to hear how people are inspired by each other...

so yay for the patty love..and uh I forgot about One More Girl too :(. I guess Patty covers everything or almost everything... I wonder if Chely Wright is thinking of covering Patty?

Oh speaking of Sweet Lorraine, isn't Patty's mother's name Lorraine y/n? If so, does that have anything to do with the song or is it just a name Patty picked because its familiar..I'm just wondering?
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Postby lily » Mon May 10, 2010 12:01 pm

Little_Kites wrote:Oh speaking of Sweet Lorraine, isn't Patty's mother's name Lorraine y/n? If so, does that have anything to do with the song or is it just a name Patty picked because its familiar..I'm just wondering?


Yes, but I do recall at some point her saying that it wasn't about anyone she knew… so I'd imagine that it's more about an imaginary person and she used a name that fit.
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Postby Arlene » Tue May 18, 2010 8:07 am

Q & A with comic Sarah Silverman on Popmatters.com:

Q: The greatest album, ever?

A: It is not possible to answer that question! But let’s see… I’ll say, Patty Griffin, 1000 Kisses.




http://www.popmatters.com/pm/feature/12 ... -silverman
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"Ginger Rogers did everything that Fred Astaire did. She just did it backwards and in high heels." ~Molly Ivins

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Postby mattimus » Fri Jul 30, 2010 4:25 pm

Kelly Clarkson listed "Top Of The World" as one of her Top 10 in Rolling Stone's recent 500 Greatest Songs issue. :)

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v195/ ... 2fdf_b.jpg
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Postby Russell » Tue Aug 03, 2010 2:28 pm

From a really sweet post published today by Margaret Cho:

I had not met Patty before this, but I had been a huge fan for many, many years. I had been introduced to her music by the wonderful and sadly missed Kevyn Aucoin. Her music reminded me of him, the bright light of him, the beauty of him always. Patty’s manager said, “She is obsessed with her dogs and country music.” So we wrote a country song about dogs. My dog in particular. My dog Ralph. The greatest.

. . .

I pulled out the words from out of my guitar case, weighted down by little Bean. I gave the dog warmed, wrinkled notes to Patty and she set them down in front of her. I left the room, returning moments later to Patty singing, “Ooooooo-ooo. Ooooooo-ooo!” and the song “Hey Big Dog” was born.


LINK: Hey Big Dog – with Patty Griffin, Ben Lee, Fiona Apple
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Postby Arlene » Tue Aug 03, 2010 3:10 pm

http://www.digitalspy.com/music/news/a2 ... ingle.html

Gwyneth Paltrow ....also noted that guest vocals from Patty Griffin and Vince Gill were added after she completed her recording.

"I did my vocal, and then Byron Gallimore, the producer, who’s unbelievable, he was like, ‘You know, I just think Vince would sing so well on this'. I was like, 'There’s no way'. And he f**king got Vince Gill to sing on the track! It’s crazy.

"He has this best voice ever, in the history of any genre. I just die for that man’s voice. And Patty Griffin, I had seen her play in New York with John Prine years ago, and I had gotten really into her record Flaming Red. Amazing. I’m so humbled."
"You've got to sing like you don't need the money, love like you'll never get hurt. You've got to dance like no one is watching. It's gotta come from the heart, if you want it to work."
~Susannah Clark

"Ginger Rogers did everything that Fred Astaire did. She just did it backwards and in high heels." ~Molly Ivins

"If I had to live my life again, I'd make the same mistakes, only sooner."
~Tallulah Bankhead

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Postby elcorazon » Thu Oct 14, 2010 11:20 am

truly just a mention, but an interesting article from today's Chicago Tribune:

Rut? Maybe Reliable? Definitely
Steve Johnson

October 14, 2010

This is about how to go to concerts.

It's not about whether you drink beer or don't drink beer, stand in the front or sit in the back, or reward a great guitar solo with aggressive clapping (safe) or your best rebel yell (you sound like a northerner).

It's about the most fundamental decision of all: who to see and why.

Tuesday night I watched Alejandro Escovedo perform live for probably the 20th time in my life, an exhilarating performance at Lincoln Hall that ranged from raucous, near-punk ("Chelsea Hotel '78") to a delicate love ballad ("Rosalie").


I have seen him in the too-sanctified confines of the Old Town School of Folk Music, both the old space on Armitage and the new one up on Lincoln. I have seen him, many times, out at FitzGerald's in Berwyn, where the big-game trophies perhaps subconsciously inspired one of his more recent songs ("Dear Head on the Wall").

I was there when Escovedo went on after midnight at a rock club near the University of Texas in Austin, and I was one of a relative handful there last summer when he played outdoors in a maybe 100-seat tent in Grant Park while some music-averse, Nashville-friendly hat act vamped on the big stage.

The point is: Anywhere, anytime, Alejandro. And here's why: Escovedo, a 59-year-old wonder of energy, innovation and stagecraft, almost always puts on a great show. He's like pizza or that other thing. Even the bad ones are pretty good.

He's one of about a dozen artists on my must-always-see list because not only do I know that they will deliver, but, more fundamentally, because I have become part of their long-running story and need to see what the next chapter holds.

Among them: Dave Alvin, ex of the Blasters, playing in the style known, inadequately, as "Americana," but by way of a blues roadhouse. Richard Thompson, English folk veteran who makes one guitar sound like three. Joe Ely. Jimmie Dale Gilmore. Gary Louris, the one-time Jayhawk. Former Nashville guy Rodney Crowell, who disappeared, then made, in his 50s, three of the best records of the last decade ("The Houston Kid," "Fate's Right Hand," "The Outsider").

Some women? Fewer, I admit, but: Shawn Colvin. Patty Griffin. And, next week, the tragically underappreciated Kim Richey, first-rate songwriter and possessor of one of the purest voices around; she'll be at Schubas Tuesday, which I hesitate to mention here because it's a tiny room, and I haven't bought a ticket yet.

All of these people, I have seen at least four times and most of them closer to a dozen. Some of you out there are nodding along with me at this record of serial re-attending. I know it because I see some of your faces time and again at these shows.

There was a long-haired guy my wife and I noticed at the first Escovedo show we saw – a revelatory few hours at FitzGerald's in the early 1990s, after his breakthrough "Gravity" record – whom we soon dubbed "Austin guy," because he would be at all the shows we were at featuring musicians from that Texas city; one day, instead of just being in the crowd, Austin guy was at Old Town, working the door.

But there are also many of you, I am sure, who cannot understand why a person would go for the same experience, or a version of it, over and over again. You visit a restaurant, you like it, even love it, but there are so many other restaurants in town. What's new? What's now?

A certain rock critic of my acquaintance (and yours, Tribune readers) has mocked me for my, shall we say, predictability. Even my own life partner, once on my side, usually by my side, now makes fun of me, rather relentlessly, for going to see Canadian agrarian songwriting genius Fred Eaglesmith every single time he comes to Chicago. Fred Eaglesmith comes to Chicago a lot (including Nov. 4 at FitzGerald's, by the way).

But I have two fundamental theories about concert going that all of these people serve. The first is that you are always looking for the best ratio of size of talent to size of room. Ultimate expressions of this: Rodney Crowell or Richard Thompson at FitzGerald's, Escovedo at Schubas.

The second is that you want people who actually know what they're doing on stage. The rock band from Brooklyn that has been written up big in Pitchfork – or the pop band that has a hit on Q-101 – can, perhaps, suddenly fill the Aragon Ballroom. And they sound great on a record, but maybe they can play live, maybe they can't. At best, you'll see a good show, but in a crowded, uncomfortable room, a space that has the music-venue equivalent of a tin ear.

But Escovedo at Lincoln Hall is as close to can't-miss as it gets. Clean, vivid sound in a small space. And beyond the songs, the playing and the singing, Escovedo does what it takes many bands years to master: He varies the texture of his music, and he knows how to shape a show.

Tuesday, he began hard and loud, settled into an acoustic middle section, then used "I Was Drunk," a fast-and-slow epic about bedspins, to transition back into the electric-guitar-based, concluding segment. The encore: a sing-along version of the Rolling Stones' "Beast of Burden" that was pure joy.

Escovedo almost always covers "Beast of Burden." (He did so at the Stone Pony in Asbury Park, N.J., this summer, and Bruce Springsteen joined him on stage; video worth seeking on YouTube.) Dave Alvin always plays "Ashgrove." Joe Ely always plays "Me and Billy the Kid" (key lyric: "we never got along").

Those are the foundation pieces; the curiosity and the satisfaction come in seeing how they build a show from there. Which covers will they play? Will the band feature cello and violin this time, or, in the case of Ely for a while, a flamenco guitar? Is Fred Eaglesmith going to do, again, the comic riff about how he had to start writing love songs just to make sure some women would come to his shows?

At Tuesday's performance, Escovedo told of a former producer who had died of cancer (Stephen Bruton) and of his 18-year-old son, Paris, who has his own band and a rebellious spirit Escovedo admires: In Paris' music, he said, there's a lot of yelling and then, "every once in a while, you make out the words 'hate' and 'father.'" Then he sang the new "Down in the Bowery," a song to his son: "I'd buy you a smile in a minute, but would you wear it?"

There is the occasional bad chapter in these stories: One time at Old Town, Rodney Crowell turned nearly half his show over to a performance poet who hadn't been on the bill.

But far more common are the good ones. I have pretty much hated amplification ever since a show at the former Old Town space where Escovedo turned off the mikes and played and sang straight into the room, nothing between our ears and his voice.

This is, I would like to think, a statement in favor of veteran excellence, rather than a defense of old-guy ossification. I love to discover new artists (even as the search has grown less relentless). Josh Ritter, for one, is working into my never-miss rotation (although he's getting awfully popular). I've been listening to an Avett Brothers live album that guarantees I'll go see them next chance I get.

And I would have joined some friends in seeing The National when they played the Riviera on a Sunday at the end of last month. But what could I do? I had already used up my concert-going chits for that weekend because Aimee Mann was in town, and I, of course, had to go see her both Friday and Saturday nights.
If I died, he'd hear about it, eventually.
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Robert Plant and the Band of Joy

Postby jmp31 » Mon Oct 25, 2010 7:24 am

In London, first of five videos to be shown:
http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/musicbl ... t-band-joy
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